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Projects
Ethiopia — New test site for SAFAB’s demo unit in Addis Ababa – 2017-03-08
One of SAFAB’s demo units has been moved to Shiro Meda, a suburb to Addis Ababa in Ethiopia. The challenge
has primarily been to reduce the high levels of iron, which is normally not a problem for JOSAB’s units since one of
the advantages with
Aqualite™ is the ability to reduce the levels of heavy metals. In the enclosed video JOSAB’s
water treatment unit demonstrates its ability to purify water from a drilled well to potable water for the inhabitants in
Shiro Meda”
Ethiopia - New test site for SAFAB
One of SAFAB’s demo units has been moved to Shiro Meda
March 2017
Video
(Updated 2017-07-03) India — JOSAB delivers purification technology to Indian infrastructure for water supply – 2017-02-15
JOSAB signed on November 29, 2016 a contract with a water treatment project in which JOSAB’s products will
purify water in 150-250 water kiosks in Hyderabad, India. The project is a collaboration between JOSAB, the local
company Natures Spring Eco Tap Pvt Ltd and the city of Hyderabad in the state of Telangana.
Several Indian newspapers have written about JOSAB and the project. Water kiosks are part of the regular water
supply in India and is attracting a lot of interest from the public. The publicity strengthens JOSAB’s brand. So far,
two English-language newspapers reported about the project and also interviewed the Mayor who confirms that the
project will be rolled out in the near future.

External Link:
Pictures: Hyderabad Water Kiosks
Times of India
Telanga Today
Water kiosks will be placed at various locations in the city of Hyderabad. JOSAB is responsible for the
purification technology and production of water kiosks, while Natures Spring Eco Tap Pvt Ltd handles the
marketing and public authorities as well as the daily operation of the units. Hyderabad city is responsible for
water supply and provides sites with appropriate demographic conditions selected based on the city's internal
statistics of previous consumed volumes of water kiosks and water needs.


The project is based on a so-called BOO (Build Own Operate), where the payment is done via water tariffs, that
is, JOSAB receives part of the revenues for a period of seven years. JOSAB gets paid based on purchased
volume according to an integrated meter in each water kiosk. JOSAB owns the water kiosks throughout the
project and beyond. The price is determined by the state to 1 rupee per liter of water and customers will fill the
water in their own bottles. Bottled water costs 10-20 rupee per liter in stores.
Payment is made with cash or a prepaid cards bought in kiosks.


As a base of the previously announced sales revenues is the signed agreement, together with a volume
assessment by the project partner and the city of Hyderabad. The calculated volume is estimated to be 4
of
water per day and machine, and hence no guarantee.
The technology in water kiosk allows production of 24
of fresh water per day. The city proposes
placement of water kiosks based on the assessed needs in areas where demand is high, such as, for example,
train stations, schools and shopping malls. The cost of, and access to, raw water is carried by the city of
Hyderabad. JOSAB’s share of revenues under 7 years is estimated to be in the range of MSEK 65-100.


JOSAB have been ready to supply the machines starting from December 2016, but delivery of the first
machines have been postponed due to delays by the authorities in Hyderabad. The previously announced
schedule is estimated to be kept, and according to the agreement all equipment will be deployed before the end
of June 2017. Delays due to authority administration are common in India. The inauguration of the first
machines will be done in the presence of a minister and is expected to occur shortly.


JOSAB manufactures water kiosks using a subcontractor based on a long-term cooperation. Production of up
to 250 water kiosks are procured and the units can be delivered within the agreed time schedule.

 
India - Karichal Water Supply
Karichal scheme near Adimalathura, Kerala, India (S660), the challenges faced by the Kerala Water Authoritity and solved by JOSAB
Treated water, 42 years later
Water from Karichal scheme used to be just chlorinated
Forty-two years after it was launched, the Karichal Water Supply Scheme has finally started distributing treated drinking water.

Launched in 1971 as the Poovar-Karichal Water Supply Scheme, this project of the Kerala Water Authority reached out to a region perennially deprived of drinking water — the State capital’s coastal belt comprising areas like Kanjiramkulam, Karumkulam, Poovar, and Puthiyathura.
However, since the quality of water supplied through the scheme, which did not have a water treatment plant, did not quite meet the expected standards, criticism and complaints were frequent. Outbreaks of cholera and other waterborne diseases on the coast were attributed to the water supplied via the scheme. The only ‘treatment’ done by KWA so far was to chlorinate the water.
Now, with the addition of a water treatment plant at the Karichal pump-house, 22km from here, the KWA is trying to make a change.



The process

The mini plant, launched on Thursday, is expected to be upgraded depending on the success. It presently comprises a 0.36 million-litre treatment plant, installed by the Stockholm-based Josab International, and treats water using clinoptilolite, a natural zeolite and weathering product of volcanic glass.

Clinoptilolite is used in a pressurised tank to remove heavy metals, bacteria, and other pollutants from water that is drawn through collection wells from Karichal Lake, after which a UV filter disinfects the filtered water. According to K. Anilkumar, the overseer at the pump-house, the treated water is now being supplied in two shifts of 10 hours each, from a 10,000L supply tank which will soon be made larger.

“As of now, we are supplying the treated water to the thickly populated coastal areas of Adimalathura, Pulluvila, Puthiyathura, Kochuthura, and Karumkulam,” he said. The Karichal scheme has two other supply tanks of 2MLD each, at Paraniyam and Poovar, from where water filtered through the two conventional filter tanks and chlorinated at the pump-house, is supplied to areas such as Kanjiramkulam, Poovar, Thirupuram and parts of Kottukal panchayat. KWA Managing Director Ashok Kumar Singh said plans were on to extend the same zeolite-based technology, which he said was being used in the State for the first time, to all 2MLD schemes of the KWA, depending on the success of this scheme. “The quality of water is such that it can straightaway be packaged and sold. The operation is simple, does not require high pressure or much area for setting up the plant and is low on maintenance costs as well,” he said.

www.thehindu.com
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Andrej Setina (1:st from left), Dennis Abraham (2:nd from right) and staff from KWA, Karichal Kerala India 2013-10-28
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JOSAB’s water purification unit Karichal Kerala India 2013-10-28
India - Ambalapara quarry at Thrikkkakara in Ernakulam district
Ambalapara quarry at Thrikkkakara in Ernakulam district, Kerala India. Project to clean the water from the abandoned quarry of Ambalapara to drinking water for thousands of families
Spent quarry to be restored

The project to benefit parchedareas in Ernakulam district

Spread across six hectares, the abandoned Ambalapara quarry at Thrikkkakara in Ernakulam district holds a huge volume of water enough to fulfil the drinking water requirements of several thousand families living in parched areas. But bacterial contamination has prevented the use of the water for domestic purposes.
The Kerala State Biodiversity Board (KSBB) is now tying up with the district administration and the Thrikkakara municipality to restore the degraded ecosystem in the spent quarry and supply potable water from the site.
The project is to be taken up under a State-wide programme for the restoration of abandoned quarries in the State.
KSBB chairman Oommen V. Oommen told  The Hindu  that a proposal to install a water treatment plant was under consideration. Dr. Oommen visited the site last week, along with Ernakulam Dollector P.I. Sheik Pareeth, Thrikkakara municipal chairman P.I. Mohammed Ali and councillor Noushad Pallachi. Water samples from the quarry had revealed the presence of e-coli and other bacteria.

The proposed water treatment plant would be based on a similar unit installed at Karichal in Thiruvananthapuram as part of a water supply scheme servicing the parched coastal belt.
“Josab International, a Stockholm-based company, will be the technology partner for the project. We are looking for a plant with a capacity of 200,000 litres a day,” said
Dr. Oommen. The plant will treat water using clinoptilolite, a natural zeolite, and weathering product of volcanic glass.

Clinoptilolite is used in a pressurised tank to remove heavy metals, bacteria, and other pollutants from water, after which a UV filter disinfects the treated water. The Kerala Water Authority (KWA) has certified the quality of water treated by the Karichal plant and the low maintenance cost of the unit.
While the district administration and the municipality will take up the treatment and supply of water from the quarry, the KSBB plans to restore the site by improving the landscape and promoting sustainable conservation.

The treated water would be supplied to parched areas in tanker lorries. Planting of vetiver is one of the options being considered to improve the green cover and check soil erosion at the site.
Citing the example of the Eden project in Cornwall, U.K., where an exhausted China clay mine was regenerated to become a major tourist destination, Dr. Oommen said abandoned quarries in Kerala could be used to create public parks sporting lush greenery. Medicinal plant gardens and butterfly parks could be established at the sites.
Member secretary, KSBB, K.P. Laladhas, said the project could also be used to claim carbon credits.
KSBB is working on a similar project to restore an abandoned quarry at Peroorkada in Thiruvananthapuram. “The KWA is studying the recharge capacity of the water body to assess its potential for drinking water supply. Simultaneously, we are looking at the possibility of hydel tourism by launching solar-powered boats for pleasure trips,” Dr. Oommen said.

www.thehindu.com
India - Jalanindi
Jalanindi Kerala India (Portable Pro)
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Pumphouse and Portable Prio Jalanindi Kerala India 2013-03
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Villagers gathered at pumphouse Jalanindi Kerala India 2013-03
Burma - MSB
The MSB's preparedness for water purification has two main purposes - partly to support an affected population in the form of bulk water purification and partly as an integral part of the MSB's own modules and projects, for instance, in setting up a base camp or as support for deployed USAR teams.
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Water purification for the affected population and field staff
The MSB's preparedness for water purification has two main purposes - partly to support an affected population in the form of bulk water purification and partly as an integral part of the MSB's own modules and projects, for instance, in setting up a base camp or as support for deployed USAR teams. 




The MSB's capability to provide water purification resources is included in the agreement with the UNHCR. Furthermore, Sweden via the MSB, has registered a water purification module with the ECHO MIC. This means that the equipment is ready, but does not necessarily need to be deployed following a request.
 
Water purification as a specific module (i.e. to support an affected population) was requested in 2010 on three occasions: once to Haiti (national organisation) and twice to Pakistan (NDMA and Unicef).

In Haiti the request did not lead to an operation, due to weak reception capacity and ambiguity over funding. In Pakistan the MSB conducted two relatively extensive water purification operations, one via the NDMA the other via Unicef.

Preparedness for water purification
The MSB’s current equipment readiness for water purification, both for direct operations and support for its own modules:
  • Three 6000 bulk water purification plants with a capacity of 6000 l / h, and with a water quality that meets Sphere standards. These are intended for operations to provide direct assistance to an affected population. This is a stand-alone plant.
  • Three 1500 water purification plants with a capacity of 1500 l / h. This plant is also used in base camps and in that case is connected to an RO 500 water purification plant. One of three of these water purification plants is intended for operations to provide direct assistance to an affected population. This is a stand-alone plant.
  • Seven RO 500 water purification plants with a capacity of 500 l / h to provide drinking water that meets EU standards for drinking water. This water purification plant is also used by USAR.
Experience from water purification operations in 2010 shows that more staff are needed than estimated earlier to install and operate a water purification plant and to ensure an uninterrupted water supply.
 
Competence profiles are available on the Field Staff Roster for readiness for water purification modules, water engineers and water experts (including a few water engineers).
 
Deployment time: The deployment time for the 6000 bulk water purification plant is 24 hours for the 1500 water purification plant and the RO 500 water purification plant it is 6 hours. Deployment time means the time from a decision being taken to deploy to the plant being ready for transportation.
 

www.msb.se (Pictures are from embeded links, www.msb.se)
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From MSB: A girl in Kot Addu in Pakistan collects drinking water from one of the water purification plants that the MSB installed after the terrible floods in 2010. Photo: Anna Hjärne
Pictures are from embeded links, www.msb.se
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From MSB: One of the three water purification plants the MSB sent to Pakistan following the major flooding in 2010. Photo: Anna Hjärne
Pictures are from embeded links, www.msb.se
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From MSB: Two of the water tanks that the MSB installed in Kot Addu in Pakistan following the major flooding in 2010. Photo: Anna Hjärne
Pictures are from embeded links, www.msb.se
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From MSB: This smaller water purification plant provides the MSB:s SWIFT USAR (Swedish International Fast Response Team - Urban Search and Rescue) team with drinking water. Photo: Stig Dahlén
Pictures are from embeded links, www.msb.se
China - Containerized SC100 in Shandong
Containerized SC100 in Shandong, China
CEO of Josab International AB, Andrej Setina, demonstrates the performance of Josab's ecological water purification system. Water is taken directly from the Yellow River in Shandong, China and purified to clean drinking water.
October 2013
Video

Kenya - Kisumu
JOSAB in Kenya
Start up of a water purification unit in Kisumu.
March 2013
Video
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